A Security Note About Your Pi-hole Logs

It has come to our attention that there are third parties asking you to upload your Pi-hole logs to them.  This is not something we recommend, condone, or otherwise find in any way acceptable.

We have designed Pi-hole to help maintain your privacy by blocking advertisements/trackers, and the act of providing your logs to anyone outside the Pi-hole project is counter-intuitive to our ideals and goals. Continue reading “A Security Note About Your Pi-hole Logs”

Part 4: What Really Happens On Your Network?

As Pi-hole’s userbase has grown, so have the posts about people discovering interesting, perplexing, and nefarious things happening on their network.  While Pi-hole doesn’t provide deep insight into the traffic in your network, it’s great for a high-level overview of the sites/domains being visited on your network.

This is the fourth iteration of this type of post.  It’s just an amalgamation of links to public forums where people have posted their discoveries and screenshots.  Enjoy! Continue reading “Part 4: What Really Happens On Your Network?”

Saturday Is The Last Day To “Show Us Your Pi-hole”

Tomorrow is the last day to send pictures of your Pi-hole setup to [email protected]  We’ll be choosing three winners by picking our favorite pictures.  The top three will receive either a Raspberry Pi 3, a Raspberry Pi Zero, or a Raspberry Pi Zero Wireless.

We’ll contact the winners via email and ask if we can share your pictures in a follow up blog post.  Thanks to everyone who has submitted pictures so far.  Good luck!

Round 3: What Really Happens On Your Network?

Here we are again

Using Pi-hole, users have discovered unexpected, strange, or disturbing things happening on their network.  In fact, so many things have been discovered (and discussed publicly), that this is our third time posting a list of things people have found happening on their networks.

Continue reading “Round 3: What Really Happens On Your Network?”