Results of the Pi-hole User Survey

Staying Free

Pi-hole will remain free in both meanings of the word: free of charge and open source.  We know the survey spooked many of your fears and you may have considered several worst case scenarios.  We heard you loud and clear, you don’t want us to charge money for Pi-hole and we won’t.

In it’s current state, Pi-hole is free of charge and can be used to protect your privacy–a human right to which everyone is entitled.  And we intend to keep it that way.  At the end of this article, you will find some information on how much it costs to run Pi-hole from month-to-month; something you wanted to know based on the survey.  This will be specific, including the salaries needed to allow us to develop full/part time and bring you more updates and features faster while also providing you better support.  It will also include the cost of support and QA/testing, marketing, research, business development, legal, operational, etc. Continue reading “Results of the Pi-hole User Survey”

Pi-hole User Survey

The survey is now complete.  Thanks to those who contributed.

Pi-hole has grown far beyond what any of us could have imagined.  As Pi-hole continues to evolve, we are looking at what Pi-hole is and if it’s meeting the demands of the market.  An experienced product manager has been helping us and has put together two surveys.  If you’re willing, please consider filling one of them out.

  • If you are already using Pi-hole, please fill out this short survey.
  • If you have not installed Pi-hole before, please fill out this short survey

Here is SurveyMonkey’s privacy policy if you are concerned about it.

 

Why Some Pages Load Slow When Using Pi-hole And How To Fix It

Pi-hole can make your network run faster, however, there are certain situations where Webpages will take a very long time to load (10-60 seconds or more).  There are several reasons behind this–most of which can be remedied.  This post explain the technical reasons why you may experience slow load times and provides solutions for them. Continue reading “Why Some Pages Load Slow When Using Pi-hole And How To Fix It”

Pi-hole Is Open Source: Consume, Contribute, Or Both?

Pi-hole is a great project for all experience levels–both as a piece of software to consume and as an open source project you can contribute to.  Whether you just started getting interested in software and want to learn how to program or contribute to an open source project; or you have been a life-long tinkerer and love to get your hands dirty with technical goodness, Pi-hole has something to offer. Continue reading “Pi-hole Is Open Source: Consume, Contribute, Or Both?”

That Time We DDoSed GitHub

It was purely unintentional, but we did disrupt GitHub’s service not long after releasing v3.2 of Pi-hole.  We received a letter from GitHub explaining that our software was querying their API too often and was disrupting their service.  So we didn’t really DDoS them, but there was enough of an impact to show up on their radar.

We knew our software was checking in with GitHub, and it wasn’t meant to be aggressive.  What we didn’t know was how many users were actually out there using our software and subsequently contributing to the issue.  As we learned, there were enough installs out there to cause a disruption to the infrastructure of a large enterprise–something we do not plan on repeating. Continue reading “That Time We DDoSed GitHub”

Part 5: What Really Happens On Your Network?

Pi-hole is known for ad-blocking, but it’s capable of more than you might know.  This post is the fifth iteration of a collection of public posts where people have discovered weird or strange things happening on their networks thanks to Pi-hole.

Since Pi-hole is a DNS server, it can keep track of which domains are queried.  While you can’t see the exact Webpage (or other asset) that was queried, you can deduce some information by knowing what domain name was queried.  For example, if a device using Pi-hole watched a video on Netflix, Pi-hole doesn’t know about the specific video–just that the Netflix domain was queried.

Below, you’ll find links and screenshots to the latest compilation of things people have discovered on their networks–enjoy! Continue reading “Part 5: What Really Happens On Your Network?”

A Security Note About Your Pi-hole Logs

It has come to our attention that there are third parties asking you to upload your Pi-hole logs to them.  This is not something we recommend, condone, or otherwise find in any way acceptable.

We have designed Pi-hole to help maintain your privacy by blocking advertisements/trackers, and the act of providing your logs to anyone outside the Pi-hole project is counter-intuitive to our ideals and goals. Continue reading “A Security Note About Your Pi-hole Logs”